Organization of American States Summits of the Americas
     
Follow-up and Implementation: Mandates
 

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SECURITY
MANDATES

  1. To strengthen programs to prevent and fight illicit smuggling of migrants and trafficking in persons, particularly of women, children and adolescents, as well as to generate, review and amend laws, where appropriate, against these crimes so that, in their enforcement, they will render assistance and protection to victims of trafficking and to promote cooperation among states to that end, in accordance with the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its protocols on trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants. (Migration, Initiatives VII Summit of the Americas, Panama City, 2015).

  1. To support the initiative of the Inter-American Violence and Crime Prevention Network, agreed to at the OAS, with a view to strengthening hemispheric cooperation on security, within the framework of the domestic legislation of each state. (Security, Initiatives VII Summit of the Americas, Panama City, 2015).

  1. To work on obtaining better data and strengthening evaluations and diagnostic assessments with a view to formulating effective public policies for the prevention of violence and crime that better address this phenomenon in the region in a comprehensive manner. In this regard, to foster the observatories on crime and violence, in accordance with the respective national legislations. (Security, Initiatives VII Summit of the Americas, Panama City, 2015).

  1. To strengthen efforts and prioritize actions to effectively address violence against women and girls, particularly through the promotion of initiatives to empower women, and the implementation of effective public policies focused on achieving this goal, including measures to prevent, investigate, punish, and eradicate such violence; training for public officials at national and local levels; implementation of programs to educate, sensitize, and raise awareness about this phenomenon; and the collection of data and statistics within, as applicable, the framework of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment, and Eradication of Violence against Women (Convention of Belém do Pará) and its follow-up mechanism. (Security, Initiatives VII Summit of the Americas, Panama City, 2015).

  1. To take note of the report “The Drug Problem in the Americas” of the OAS Secretary General and to recognize the progress and reaffirm the commitments made at the forty-third regular session of the OAS General Assembly “For a Comprehensive Policy against the World Drug Problem in the Americas”, and the forty-sixth special session of the OAS General Assembly “Reflections and Guidelines to Formulate and Follow up on Comprehensive Policies to Address the World Drug Problem in the Americas”. To that end, we decide to continue with the dialogue in preparation for the special session of the United Nations General Assembly on the global drug problem to be held in 2016. (Security, Initiatives VII Summit of the Americas, Panama City, 2015).

  1. To continue efforts to prevent and combat illicit trafficking of firearms, ammunitions, explosives and other related materials with the aim of reducing high crime rates and violence in the region using, among others, the existing mechanisms in the OAS and the United Nations. (Security, Initiatives VII Summit of the Americas, Panama City, 2015).

  1. To take note that Trinidad and Tobago hosted the first preparatory meeting towards the First Conference of States Parties to the Arms Trade Treaty and that it is interested in hosting the Secretariat of the Arms Trade Treaty; to note, also, the commitment of the Government of Mexico to hosting the First Conference of States Parties to the Treaty in 2015. (Security, Initiatives VII Summit of the Americas, Panama City, 2015).

  1. To strengthen holistic efforts with special attention to socio-economic factors to prevent juvenile delinquency through actions and mechanisms that foster livelihood, sociability, self-esteem, and well-being among young people. (Security, Initiatives VII Summit of the Americas, Panama City, 2015).

  1. To strengthen and promote bilateral, subregional, regional, and international cooperation to prevent and combat violence, corruption, and transnational organized crime in all its forms and manifestations, and to promote institutional strengthening and, where applicable, rehabilitation and social reintegration, within the framework of the international conventions and instruments in force, with full respect for the rule of law, domestic and international law, and human rights, and, to that end, call upon all citizens to participate and lend their support. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. To continue implementing comprehensive policies, strategies, and actions that seek to prevent crime and insecurity, taking into account links between security and development, as well as to address all causes of violence and promote peaceful coexistence and resolution of disputes among citizens, with special attention to youth and other vulnerable groups. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. To implement policies containing measures to prevent, investigate, punish, penalize, and eradicate sexual and gender based violence. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. To improve the effectiveness and efficiency of comprehensive public policies on citizen security through actions such as the generation and use of relevant and timely information and the strengthening of the capacity and coordination of institutions that participate in the management of citizen security. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. To strengthen the system of hemispheric cooperation to prevent and combat transnational organized crime, taking into consideration the economic purpose associated with this phenomenon, through mechanisms that support the strengthening of the necessary national capacities, as appropriate, to confront these threats in a concerted manner, taking advantage of experiences and available resources from existing networks, bodies, and mechanisms, in accordance with international and domestic law. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. To strengthen the administration of public security by governmental agencies through promotion of citizen and community participation, institutional coordination, and training and education of civilian and police personnel, with full respect for the rule of law, domestic law, gender equality, and human rights. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. To promote and strengthen citizen and community participation in the promotion and sustainability of citizen security policies and programs. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. To implement public policies in the realm of citizen security that make the human being their primary focus, within a framework of democratic order, the rule of law, and observance of human rights. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. To strengthen our efforts to prevent and fight the smuggling of migrants and trafficking of persons, particularly of women, children and adolescents, and to promote cooperation among states to that end, respecting and fully protecting their human rights. (Citizen Security and Transnational Organized Crime, Cartagena, 2012).

  1. We recognise the importance of addressing the threats, concerns and other challenges to security in the Hemisphere that are diverse, multidimensional in scope and impact on the well-being of our citizens. We reaffirm that our concept of security in the Hemisphere incorporates the priorities of each State, contributes to the consolidation of peace, integral development and social justice, and is based on democratic values, respect for and promotion and defence of human rights, solidarity, cooperation and respect for national sovereignty. It is indispensable for our States to strengthen cooperation on security matters. We therefore reaffirm our commitment to the Declaration on Security in the Americas (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We reiterate our most vigorous condemnation of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, as criminal and unjustifiable under any circumstances, in any place, and regardless of who perpetrates it, because it poses a grave threat to international peace and security, and to the democracy, stability and prosperity of the countries in the region. We commit to prevent, punish and eliminate terrorism and to continue the fight against all criminal activities that finance and facilitate it, with full respect for domestic law and international law, including international human rights law, international humanitarian law and international refugee law. We also commit to strengthen cooperation, including mutual legal assistance and extradition, in combating terrorism and its financing, in accordance with our domestic law and established international conventions. We urge those States that have not yet done so to accede to the international conventions on terrorism (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We will continue to fight all forms of transnational organised crime, illicit trafficking in drugs, illicit trafficking in arms, ammunition and explosives, illicit trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants, money laundering, corruption, terrorism, kidnapping, criminal gangs, and crimes associated with the use of technology, including cyber crime. We therefore reaffirm our will to implement the Commitment to Public Security in the Americas adopted by the First Meeting of Ministers Responsible for Public Security in the Americas in October 2008 in Mexico City, the commitments emanating from Meetings of Ministers of Justice or other Ministers or Attorneys General of the Americas (REMJA), as well as the 2006 Hemispheric Plan of Action Against Transnational Organised Crime. We thus invite the international community and international financial organisations to continue making financial contributions and other appropriate forms of assistance, within the scope of their respective competencies, to facilitate the achievement of the objectives of public security in the Americas (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. Accordingly, we commit to fostering public policies, in coordination with pertinent institutions and with citizen and community participation, designed to prevent crime, violence and insecurity, and to strengthen with a multidimensional approach and in accordance with domestic law, the channels of communication and the exchange of information, practices and experiences among Member States in combating and preventing crimes affecting public security. Moreover, we will strengthen our national and regional capacities through, inter alia, increased cooperation and technical assistance, as appropriate, that enable us to benefit from the expertise of each Member State (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We will increase our efforts to prevent and combat all aspects of the global drug problem and related crimes, with strengthened international cooperation and an integral and balanced approach based on the principle of common and shared responsibility, in accordance with the principles enshrined in the United Nations and OAS Charters, international law and our applicable legal frameworks. To this end, we will strengthen our national capacities and will continue to implement, as appropriate, the recommendations of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM). We welcome the completion of its latest Evaluation Round, and we will continue strengthening the Mechanism so as to enable it to face the new challenges and needs of the countries of the Hemisphere. We also recognise the importance of sustainable alternative development programmes and, where appropriate, of preventive alternative development in tackling the global drug problem (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We request that the General Secretariat of the OAS submit to the next Summit of the Americas a progress report on the implementation of commitments made at the Meetings of Ministers Responsible for Public Security in the Americas (MISPA) and at the Meetings of Ministers of Justice or other Ministers or Attorneys General of the Americas (REMJA). We look forward to advancing further cooperation at these meetings and the work of the OAS in support of the MISPA and the REMJA. We express appreciation for the ongoing technical support of the OAS in matters covered by these meetings (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We recognise that violence is preventable and as such, we will formulate or strengthen policies that take an integrated approach to its prevention. To this end, we will complement law-enforcement policies with other violence-prevention strategies of measurable outcomes, in areas such as education, labour, health and other pertinent fields, as appropriate. We will continue to strengthen and implement activities that promote a culture of non-violence within a public health context, and to create safe, healthy, sustainable environments and communities. We acknowledge the Declaration of the First Meeting of Ministers of Health of the Americas on Violence and Injury Prevention, held in Merida, Mexico in March 2008, which commits to further innovate, develop, implement, and evaluate plans for violence prevention (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We are convinced that illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives and other related materials are a threat to security, breed violence, exacerbate conflicts and adversely affect the rule of law. We reiterate the need for effective cooperation to prevent, combat and eradicate this threat and in this regard we reaffirm the value of the Inter-American Convention against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives and other Related Materials (CIFTA) and its model legislation as a basis for such cooperation. We will continue to combat the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives and other related materials by, among other actions, marking and tracing firearms, destroying excess stocks of firearms designated by each State, securing and managing stockpiles and regulating firearms brokering, including sanctions for illicit arms brokering for the purpose of avoiding their diversion through illicit channels and their proliferation (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We will redouble our efforts to prevent access to our financial systems by funds/assets of illicit origin, through national measures and international cooperation to identify, track, freeze, seize or forfeit the funds/assets that are proceeds of criminal activity, and determine their destination and/or return in accordance with our national legislation and international law (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We also emphasise our decision to address the criminal gang problem, its related aspects and its effects on the social environment, which challenge the progress made by our societies in the process to achieve stability, democratisation and sustainable development, taking a global approach that includes, inter alia, prevention, rehabilitation and reintegration of individuals affected by this phenomenon. To that end, we will encourage OAS efforts to prepare a comprehensive hemispheric strategy to promote inter-American cooperation in dealing with criminal gangs (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We recognise the important role of the OAS in the peaceful resolution of our differences, its participation in the promotion of a culture of democracy, peace, dialogue and non-violence in the region, as well as its role in the implementation of the Inter-American Democratic Charter. We commit to improve the capacity of the OAS in its efforts to assist in enhancing peace and the democratic, social and economic stability of our region (Declaration of Port of Spain, 2009).

  1. We will promote economic prosperity by ensuring that the community of democratic states remains committed to peace and to dealing with threats, concerns, and other challenges to security. We reiterate our commitment to the objectives and purposes contained in the Declaration on Security in the Americas based on a multidimensional concept of security, and will continue to strengthen cooperation among our states (Declaration of Mar del Plata, 2005).

  1. We state that terrorism affects the normal functioning of our societies and has a negative impact on our economies and labor markets and particularly the generation of jobs. To sustain an environment to promote economic prosperity and the well-being of our people, we will take all necessary steps to prevent and counter terrorism and its financing in full compliance with our obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law, international human rights law, and international refugee law (Declaration of Mar del Plata, 2005).

  1. We will strengthen the timely exchanges of information and the broadest possible mutual legal assistance in order to prevent, combat, and eliminate terrorism, prevent the international movement of terrorists and ensure their prosecution, and, as appropriate, their extradition in accordance with domestic laws and relevant treaties and conventions. We will cooperate to avoid that any individual who participates in the financing, planning, preparation and commission of terrorist acts finds safe haven in our countries (Declaration of Mar del Plata, 2005).

  1. We emphasize our concern for the criminal gang problem and its related aspects, as well as its effect on the economic and social environments that challenge the progress made by our societies in the stability, democratization, and sustainable development process: a situation that requires additional urgent action to promote the prevention of criminal acts, prosecute those who commit them, rehabilitate and reinsert them, and create opportunities to facilitate access by youth to decent work (Declaration of Mar del Plata, 2005).

  1. To continue to strengthen regional cooperation and the mobilization of resources to advance in the fight against the production, trafficking and consumption of illicit drugs and psychotropic substances, calling upon the countries of the hemisphere, in cooperation with the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD), to: develop, implement, and evaluate substance abuse prevention programs, in particular for children and young people, such as “Life Skills”, among others; expand the “Program to Estimate the Human, Social, and Economic Cost of Drugs in the Americas”; and promote support for the integral and sustainable development strategies carried out by the countries affected by cultivation and production of illicit drugs.(Plan of Action Mar del Plata, 2005).

  1. Taking into account the theme of the Mar del Plata Summit and bearing in mind that our concept of security is multidimensional, to promote through concrete actions, at the national, sub-regional, hemispheric, and global levels, the implementation of the commitments identified in the Declaration on Security in the Americas. (Plan of Action Mar del Plata, 2005).

  1. To identify, before December 2006, specific initiatives for cooperation, and the exchange of experiences in the development of technical skills in our countries that contribute to the full application of the provisions of the Inter-American Convention Against Corruption, and the strengthening of its Implementation Follow-up Mechanism (MESICIC), giving special consideration to the recommendations to that effect arising from the first round of said Mechanism.(Plan of Action Mar del Plata, 2005).

  1. We reiterate our commitment to the objectives and purposes contained in the Declaration on Security in the Americas, approved at the Special Conference on Security, held in Mexico City in October 2003, based on, inter alia, the multidimensional concept of security as well as the principle that the basis and purpose of security is the protection of human beings. (Declaration of Nuevo León, 2004).

  1. This is our first meeting since the tragic events of September 11, 2001. We reiterate that terrorism, as well as the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; constitute grave threats to international security, to the institutions and the democratic values of States, and to the well-being of our peoples. We resolve to intensify our efforts and strengthen cooperation in confronting these threats (Declaration of Nuevo León, 2004).

  1. We will take all necessary steps to prevent and counter terrorism and its financing in full compliance with our obligations under international law, including international human rights, refugee, and humanitarian law. Similarly, we commit to fight all forms of transnational crime, including illicit trafficking in drugs, arms, and persons, particularly when they generate funds used in support of terrorist organizations. We also commit to adhere to global anti- money laundering and anti-terrorist financing standards.

  1. We call upon all countries that have not yet done so to ratify the Inter-American Convention against Terrorism, the twelve United Nations conventions and protocols on terrorism, as well as other related instruments. We further call upon all countries to urgently consider signing and ratifying the Inter-American Convention on Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters and to participate actively in the Network on Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters.

  1. We reaffirm our commitment to maintain peace and security through the effective use of hemispheric means for the peaceful resolution of disputes and the adoption of confidence- and security-building measures. In this regard, we support and commend the efforts of the OAS. We reiterate our full adherence to the principle that commits states to refrain from the threat or use of force, in accordance with international law. In conformity with the principles of international humanitarian law, we strongly condemn attacks on civilian populations. We will take all feasible measures to ensure that the children of our countries do not participate in armed conflict and we condemn the use of children by irregular forces. We reaffirm that the constitutional subordination of armed forces and security forces to the legally constituted civilian authorities of our countries, as well as respect for the rule of law on the part of all national institutions and sectors of society, are fundamental to democracy. We will strive to limit military expenditures while maintaining capabilities commensurate with our legitimate security needs and will promote greater transparency in the acquisition of arms (Declaration of Québec, 2001).

  1. We reiterate our commitment to combat new, multi-dimensional threats to the security of our societies. Foremost amongst these threats are the global drug problem and related crimes, the illicit traffic in and criminal use of firearms, the growing danger posed by organized crime and the general problem of violence in our societies. Acknowledging that corruption undermines core democratic values, challenges political stability and economic growth and thus threatens vital interests in our Hemisphere, we pledge to reinvigorate our fight against corruption. We also recognize the need to improve the conditions for human security in the Hemisphere (Declaration of Québec, 2001).

  1. Recognizing the extreme nature of the drug problem in the region, renewing their unwavering commitment to fight it in all its manifestations from an integral perspective, in accordance with the principle of shared responsibility, through the coordination of national efforts and in a spirit of cooperation and mutual respect as established in the Hemispheric Anti-Drug Strategy, and also recognizing the work accomplished by the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) and the Governmental Experts Group appointed to undertake the first round of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM):(Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Note with satisfaction the creation and implementation of the MEM, and reiterate their commitment to make this instrument, unique in the world, a central pillar of assistance toward effective hemispheric cooperation in the struggle against all the component elements of the global drug problem ;(Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Implement the proposals and recommendations found in the national and hemispheric reports, approved by CICAD, in accordance with the specific situation of each country ;( Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Continue strengthening and reviewing the MEM to monitor national and hemispheric efforts against drugs, and recommend concrete actions to encourage inter-American cooperation and national strategies to combat this scourge ; Recommend:

    • Intensifying joint IDB-CICAD efforts in order to obtain financial resources from the international donor community, through consultative groups supporting anti-drug efforts, for alternative development, as well as demand reduction programs;

    • Establishing units with financial intelligence functions in countries that have not yet done so, with the support of CICAD and international agencies specialized in this area, and for which, in this context, it is recommended that CICAD and IDB training efforts be expanded;

    Developing, within the framework of CICAD, a long-term strategy that includes a three-year program to establish a basic and homogeneous mechanism to estimate the social, human and economic costs of the drug problem in the Americas, and to support countries through the necessary technical assistance; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Promote bilateral and multilateral cooperation and information exchange on policies and actions concerning drug prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and supply control, and develop educational campaigns to promote public awareness of the risk of drug consumption ;( Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Support measures to impede organized crime, money-laundering, the diversion of chemical precursors, the financing of armed groups, and other illicit activities resulting from drug and arms trafficking ;( Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Promote bilateral and multilateral cooperation in order to consider in an integral manner the displacement phenomenon of different factors related to the drug problem, including the displacement of persons and illicit crops ; ( Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Encourage all countries in the Hemisphere to consider signing and ratifying, ratifying, or acceding to, as soon as possible and as the case may be, the UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime, its Protocol Against the Smuggling of Migrants by Land, Sea and Air and its Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, as well as the Protocol Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Components, and Ammunition, once that protocol is open for signature; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Implement collective strategies, including those that emerge from the Meetings of Ministers of Justice of the Americas, to enhance the institutional ability of states to exchange information and evidence by concluding international agreements on mutual legal assistance where necessary, develop and circulate national reports, and strengthen cooperation, seeking the technical and financial support of multilateral organizations and MDBs where appropriate, in order to jointly combat emerging forms of transnational criminal activity, including trafficking in persons and the laundering of the proceeds and assets of crime and cyber-crime; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Review national laws and policies to improve cooperation in areas such as mutual legal assistance, extradition and deportation to countries of origin, acknowledging the serious concerns of countries that deport certain foreign nationals for committing crimes in those countries and the serious concerns of the receiving countries about the negative effect of these deportations on the incidence of criminality in the countries of origin, and express the desire to work together, as appropriate, to address the negative effects on our societies. (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Promote, where necessary, and in accordance with national legislation, the adoption of investigation techniques, contained in the United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime, which are very important tools in the fight against organized crime; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Recognizing that violence and crime are serious obstacles to social harmony and the democratic and socio-economic development of the Hemisphere, and as well noting the urgent need for an integral approach toward the prevention of violence: (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Encourage national institutions to work together and coordinate with all appropriate multilateral organizations and MDBs in order to implement integrated programs that include initiatives for conflict resolution, where appropriate, for sustained prevention, permanent attention, public education and treatment relevant to cases of violence against persons, families and communities, strengthening national institutional capacities in these areas; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Increase regional cooperation with a view to preventing the criminal use of firearms and ammunition, and examine additional measures and laws at the national level if required ;(Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Implement, as soon as possible, the Inter-American Convention Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives and Other Related Materials, and apply the CICAD Model Regulations, as appropriate; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Recognizing that democracy is essential for peace, development and security in the Hemisphere which, in turn, are the best basis for furthering the welfare of our people, and noting that the constitutional subordination of armed forces and security forces to the legally constituted authorities of our states is fundamental to democracy:(Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Hold the Special Conference on Security in 2004, for which the OAS Committee on Hemispheric Security will conclude the review of all issues related to approaches to international security in the Hemisphere, as defined at the Santiago Summit ;( Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Continue with priority activities on conflict prevention and the peaceful resolution of disputes, respond to shared traditional and non-traditional security and defense concerns and support measures to improve human security;(Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Support the efforts of the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) to address their special security concerns, recognizing that for the smallest and most vulnerable states in the Hemisphere , security is multi-dimensional in scope, involves state and non-state actors and includes political, economic, social and natural components, and that the SIDS have concluded that among the threats to their security are illicit drug trafficking, the illegal trade in arms, increasing levels of crime and corruption, environmental vulnerability exacerbated by susceptibility to natural disasters and the transportation of nuclear waste, economic vulnerability particularly in relation to trade, new health threats including the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) pandemic and increased levels of poverty; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Improve the transparency and accountability of defense and security institutions and promote greater understanding and cooperation among government agencies involved in security and defense issues, through such means as increased sharing of defense policy and doctrine papers, information and personnel exchanges, including, where feasible, cooperation and training for participation in UN peace-keeping activities and to respond better to legitimate security and defense needs, by improving transparency of arms acquisitions in order to improve confidence and security in the Hemisphere; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Continue promoting greater degrees of confidence and security in the Hemisphere, inter alia through sustained support for measures, such as those set forth in the Santiago and San Salvador Declarations on Confidence and Security Building Measures (CSBMs), and for existing mechanisms, agreements and funds, and consider signing and ratifying, ratifying, or acceding to, as soon as possible and as the case may be, the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, the Inter-American Convention on Transparency in Conventional Weapons Acquisitions, and the Inter-American Convention Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives and Other Related Materials, giving full support to the UN Conference on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in all Its Aspects to be held in July 2001, bearing in mind the results of the Regional Preparatory Meeting of Latin America and the Caribbean, held in Brasilia in November 2000, and the work of the OAS, which contributed a regional perspective to the discussions;(Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Strongly support the Third Meeting of State Parties to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, to be held in September 2001 in Managua, Nicaragua, and the Review Conference of the 1980 UN Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects, to be held in December 2001 in Geneva; as well as the efforts of the OAS to pursue the goal of the conversion of the Western Hemisphere into an anti-personnel- landmine-free zone;(Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Call for an experts meeting, before the Special Conference on Security, as a follow-up to the regional conferences of Santiago and San Salvador on CSBMs, in order to evaluate implementation and consider next steps to further consolidate mutual confidence Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Promote financial support to the OAS Fund for Peace: Peaceful Settlement of Territorial Disputes, established to provide financial resources to assist with defraying the inherent costs of proceedings previously agreed to by the parties concerned for the peaceful resolution of territorial disputes among OAS member states; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Support the work leading up to the Fifth Meeting of Defense Ministers of the Americas to take place in Chile, as well as meetings that will take place subsequently; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Support the work initiated by the Inter American Committee on Terrorism (CICTE) established within the OAS as a result of the Commitment of Mar del Plata adopted in 1998, and encourages hemispheric cooperation to prevent, combat and eliminate all forms of terrorism, taking into account the approval of the Statute and Work Plan of CICTE; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. Consider signing and ratifying, ratifying, or acceding to, as soon as possible and as the case may be, those international agreements related to the fight against terrorism, in accordance with their respective internal legislation; (Plan of Action Québec, 2001).

  1. With deep satisfaction, we note that peace, an essential value for human coexistence, is a reality in the Hemisphere. We underscore that Central America has become a zone of peace, democracy, and development and we recognize efforts to eliminate antipersonnel mines and to rehabilitate their victims. We will continue to foster confidence and security among our countries through such measures as those mentioned in the Santiago and San Salvador Declarations on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures. We encourage the pacific settlement of disputes (Declaration of Santiago, 1998).

  1. We will lend new impetus to the struggle against corruption, money laundering, terrorism, weapons trafficking, and the drug problem, including illicit use, and work together to ensure that criminals do not find safe haven anywhere in the Hemisphere. We are determined to persevere in this direction (Declaration of Santiago, 1998).

  1. In forging an alliance against drugs and applying the Hemispheric Anti-Drug Strategy, we welcome the start of formal negotiations at the May 4 meeting of Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) to be held in Washington within the framework of the Organization of American States (OAS), to establish an objective procedure for the multilateral evaluation of actions and cooperation to prevent and combat all aspects of the drug problem and related crimes, based on the principles of sovereignty, territorial integrity of States, shared responsibility, and with a comprehensive and balanced approach (Declaration of Santiago, 1998).

  1. Continue to develop their national and multilateral efforts in order to achieve full application of the Hemispheric Anti-Drug Strategy, and will strengthen this alliance based on the principles of respect for the sovereignty and territorial jurisdiction of the States, reciprocity, shared responsibility and an integrated, balanced approach in conformity with their domestic laws.(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. With the intention of strengthening mutual confidence, dialogue and hemispheric cooperation and on the basis of the aforementioned principles, develop, within the framework of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD-OAS), a singular and objective process of multilateral governmental evaluation in order to monitor the progress of their individual and collective efforts in the Hemisphere and of all the countries participating in the Summit, in dealing with the diverse manifestations of the problem. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Enhance their national policies and plans with regard to the prevention of illicit drug consumption, and step up measures, particularly at the community level, in schools and those aimed at the most vulnerable groups, such as children and young people, in order to prevent the growth and spread of this consumption and to eliminate financial incentives to illicit trafficking;(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Increase cooperation in areas such as the collection and analysis of data, standardization of systems that measure illicit consumption, scientific and technical training and exchange of experiences; (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Develop or encourage the development of campaigns to foster greater social awareness of the dangers of drug abuse for individuals, the family and society as well as community participation plans;(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Sensitize public opinion as to the serious effects of drug abuse and the activities of criminal organizations that deal with them, including at the wholesale and retail level; (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Improve and update cooperative mechanisms to prosecute and extradite individuals charged with the traffic in narcotics and psychotropic substances and other related crimes , in accordance with international agreements, constitutional requirements, and national laws;(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Establish or strengthen existing, duly trained and equipped specialized central units responsible for requesting, analyzing and exchanging among the competent State authorities information relating to the laundering of the proceeds, assets and instrumentalities used in criminal activities (also known as money laundering); (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Reinforce international and national control mechanisms to impede the illicit traffic and diversion of chemical precursors; (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Promote the rapid ratification and entry into force of the Inter-American Convention Against the Illicit Production and Trafficking of Firearms; promote the approval and prompt application of the Model Regulations on the Control of Arms and Explosives Connected with Drug Trafficking of CICAD; encourage States, that have not already done so, to adopt the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure effective international cooperation to prevent and combat illicit transnational traffic in firearms and ammunition, while establishing, or strengthening, systems to enhance the tracing of firearms used in criminal activity; and (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Eliminate illicit crops through the increased support of national alternative development programs as well as eradication and interdiction.(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Strengthen national drug control commissions, with a view to improving coordination in each country in the planning and implementation of their respective national plans and in streamlining international assistance in this area (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Underscore the valuable contribution of civil society, through its different organizations, in the areas of prevention of illicit consumption, treatment, rehabilitation, and social reintegration of drug addicts. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Encourage financial institutions to redouble their efforts to prevent money laundering and the appropriate business sectors to strengthen its controls to prevent the diversion of chemical precursors. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Give full support to the upcoming Special Session of the United Nations General Assembly which will be held in June 1998 for the purpose of promoting international cooperation with respect to illicit drugs and related crimes and encourage all States to participate actively, at the highest level, in that international meeting. They will make every effort to ensure effective implementation of international narcotics agreements to which they have subscribed, at regional and subregional levels, and for these to operate in consonance with the hemispheric effort and reaffirm their support for CICAD and its fundamental role in the implementation of these agreements.(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Take measures, as agreed in the Declaration and Plan of Action of Lima, in order to prevent, combat and eliminate terrorism, applying for that purpose the most decisive will to comply with the general objectives set forth therein. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Encourage States that have not yet done so to sign, ratify, or accede to, as appropriate, the international conventions related to terrorism, in accordance with their respective internal legislation. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Convene, under the auspices of the Organization of American States (OAS), the Second Specialized Inter-American Conference to evaluate the progress attained and to define future courses of action for the prevention, combat and elimination of terrorism. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Promote regional dialogue with a view to revitalizing and strengthening the institutions of the Inter-American system, taking into account the new political, economic, social and strategic-military factors in the Hemisphere and in its subRegions. To that end, they will seek to expand further a climate of confidence and security among the States of the Hemisphere. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Carry out, in the manner in which they are set forth, the measures and recommendations resulting from the Regional Conferences on Confidence and Security Building Measures, held in November 1995, in Santiago, Chile, and in February 1998, in San Salvador, El Salvador, under the auspices of the Organization of American States (OAS). (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Continue to support the efforts of small-island States to address their special security concerns, which are multidimensional in nature, and economic, financial, and environmental matters, taking into account the vulnerability and level of development of these States. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. In furtherance of efforts to transform the Western Hemisphere into an antipersonnel mine-free zone, and in recognition of the contribution in this regard of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production, and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, including its early entry into force, they will encourage actions and support international humanitarian demining efforts in this area, with the goal of ensuring that priority is given to mines that threaten civilians and of ensuring that land can be restored for productive purpose. The latter will take place through effective regional and international cooperation and coordination, as requested by the affected States, to survey, mark, map, and remove mines; effective mine awareness for the civilian population and assistance to victims; and development and deployment of new mine detection and clearance technologies, as appropriate. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Continue promoting transparency in matters related to defense policy, among other aspects, with regard to modernizing the Armed Forces, comparing military expenditure in the Region, and strengthening the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Increase cooperation with United Nations peacekeeping efforts.(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Pledge their efforts to ensure that the peaceful resolution of pending conflicts and disputes is achieved through existing mechanisms for the peaceful settlement of disputes within the Inter-American System and in keeping with international law and treaties in force, and express that said mechanisms and instruments should be strengthened. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Acknowledge the value of ministerial or high-level meetings on the topics of international defense and security, such as the Defense Ministerials of Williamsburg and Bariloche, as an important contribution to regional dialogue on these matters, and, in this context, encourage interested countries to hold other meetings. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. [Entrust the OAS, through the Committee on the Hemispheric Security, to:] Follow up on and expand topics relating to confidence and security building measures (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. [Entrust the OAS, through the Committee on the Hemispheric Security, to:] Analyze the meaning, scope, and implications of international security concepts in the Hemisphere, with a view to developing the most appropriate common approaches by which to manage their various aspects, including disarmament and arms control; and; (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. [Entrust the OAS, through the Committee on the Hemispheric Security, to:] Pinpoint ways to revitalize and strengthen the institutions of the Inter-American System related to the various aspects of Hemispheric Security. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. This process will culminate in a Special Conference on Security, within the framework of the OAS, to be held, at the latest, at the beginning of the next decade.(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. [Entrust the OAS, through the Committee on the Hemispheric Security, to:] Support the convening of a follow-up Regional Conference to the Santiago and San Salvador Regional Conferences on Confidence and Security Building Measures, to further build mutual confidence in the Americas.(Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. The progress achieved in these matters will be reported to States, thereby ensuring appropriate follow-up through the OAS, so that these topics may be discussed at the next Summit of the Americas. (Plan of Action Santiago, 1998).

  1. Recognizing the pernicious effects of organized crime and illegal narcotics on our economies, ethical values, public health, and the social fabric, we will join the battle against the consumption, production, trafficking and distribution of illegal drugs, as well as against money laundering and the illicit trafficking in arms and chemical precursors. We will also cooperate to create viable alternative development strategies in those countries in which illicit crops are grown. Cooperation should be extended to international and national programs aimed at curbing the production, use and trafficking of illicit drugs and the rehabilitation of addicts (Declaration of Principles Miami, 1994)

  1. We condemn terrorism in all its forms, and we will, using all legal means, combat terrorist acts anywhere in the Americas with unity and vigor (Declaration of Principles Miami, 1994).

  • 6.1 The problems of illegal drug and related criminal activities pose grave threats to the societies, free market economies, and democratic institutions of the Hemisphere. Drug use imposes enormous social costs; drug money and income are net drains on economic growth; and drug lords and criminal organizations endanger the security of our people through corruption, intimidation, and violence. While drug trafficking continues to be a significant source of illegal funds, the money laundering industry increasingly deals with the proceeds of all types of criminal activity. An integrated and balanced approach that includes respect for national sovereignty is essential to confront all aspects of these problems. For these reasons, a broad coordinated hemispheric strategy to reduce drug use and production, including new enforcement methods that can disrupt drug trafficking and money laundering networks and prosecutes those engaged in such activities, is required. In this context, governments note the work of the 1992 San Antonio Summit, endorse the efforts of the Inter-American Commission on Drug Abuse Control, and agree to work together to formulate a counter-narcotics strategy for the 21st Century. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.2 Ratify the 1988 United Nations Convention Against the Illicit Traffic of Narcotics and Psychotropic Substances and make it a criminal offense to launder the proceeds of all serious crimes. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.3 Enact legislation to permit the freezing and forfeiture of the proceeds of money laundering and consider the sharing of forfeited assets among governments. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.4 As agreed by ministers and representatives of Caribbean and Latin American governments in the Kingston Declaration, November 5-6, 1992, implement the recommendations of the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering and work to adopt the Model Regulations of the Inter-American Commission on Drug Abuse Control (CICAD). (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.5 Encourage financial institutions to report large and suspicious transactions to appropriate authorities and develop effective procedures that would allow the collection of relevant information from financial institutions. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.6 Work individually and collectively to identify the region's narcotics trafficking and money laundering networks, prosecute their leaders, and seize assets derived from these criminal activities. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.7 Adopt programs to prevent and reduce the demand for and the consumption of illicit drugs. Adopt effective and environmentally-sound national strategies to prevent or reduce substantially the cultivation and processing of crops used for the illegal drug trade, paying particular attention to national and international support for development programs that create viable economic alternatives to drug production. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.8 Pay particular attention to the control of precursor chemicals and support comprehensive drug interdiction strategies (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.9 Strengthen efforts to control firearms, ammunition, and explosives to avoid their diversion to drug traffickers and criminal organizations (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.10 Hold a working-level conference, to be followed by a ministerial conference, to study and agree on a coordinated hemispheric response, including consideration of an inter-American convention, to combat money laundering. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.11 Convene a hemispheric-wide conference of donors, including multilateral development banks and UN agencies, to seek resources for alternative development programs aimed at curbing the production, trafficking, and use of illicit drugs, and the rehabilitation of addicts. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.12 Support the discussion the OAS has initiated with the European Union on measures to control precursor chemicals. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 6.13 Support the convening of a global counter-narcotics conference. (Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 7.1 National and international terrorism constitute a systematic and deliberate violation of the rights of individuals and an assault on democracy itself. Recent attacks that some of our countries have suffered have demonstrated the serious threat that terrorism poses to security in the Americas. Actions by governments to combat and eliminate this threat are essential elements in guaranteeing law and order and maintaining confidence in government, both nationally and internationally. Within this context, those who sponsor terrorist acts or assist in their planning or execution through the abuse of diplomatic privileges and immunities or other means will be held responsible by the international community.(Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 7.2 Promote bilateral and subregional agreements with the aim of prosecuting terrorists and penalizing terrorist activities within the context of the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms.(Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

  • 7.3 Convene a special conference of the OAS on the prevention of terrorism.(Plan of Action Miami, 1994).

 

 

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